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Four things to consider when preparing to buy and hatch baby chicks

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Four things to consider when preparing to buy and hatch baby chicks

So, do you want to hatch or buy baby chicks? This could be a great experience. But if you don’t plan ahead, it might turn into your worst nightmare. The four questions I’m about to ask you are going to help you make sure it’s the best decision for you and your family.

And as the saying goes, there’s a great responsibility for big chickens. And you’re supposed to multiply that by at least ten for your baby chicks. You may think you’ve been dreaming about all that you need to do.

You may have been dreaming of having poultry for years. You’ve understood it, you know what the legal implications are, and you’ve asked yourself all the right questions about how a poultry farming blends into your society.

But,

What do you have to do with the baby chicks that turn out to be male?

It’s the most important issue of all. Do you want roosters in your flock? And if you buy pure baby chicks, you’re not going to be able to tell the gender of the chick. And some decent hatcheries will be mixed in males and females. If you incubate your own, you can’t hatch anything but chickens. For a few breeds, you can’t say if the eggs turn out to be male or female. When you incubate and hatch sex-linked breeds like Speckled Sussex, you’ll be able to tell which breed-but not until they have hatched. Okay, so what?

Can you legally keep the male crow in your part of the world? Would you like to do that? How do you feel that your hens are constantly hurt by an over-zealous chicken in the folks? What are you going to react to when your amazing-looking rooster decides that he wants to defend his family, which he’s genetically trained to do by hitting you every time you’re in the coop?

These spurts are sharp and strong. It can make collecting eggs and spending time with your chickens a much less enjoyable experience. Not every rooster is a guard-boy, but most of them are. This is their work.

They’re not bad or malicious, they’re protectors, and they’re doing what they’re meant to do. This is one of the most serious problems with buying or hatching your own chickens. Before you begin, be very, very sure that you can either keep them or find their homes. It’s not necessary to kill the males because you didn’t think things were going through properly. If you don’t have an answer, please, don’t even think about incubating or buying baby chicks!

Are you going to get your baby chicks bred?

Shortly those tiny fluff balls will spread. In a couple of days, wing feathers have begun to grow, and within a week, they will be experimenting with flight. They don’t fly far, or for a long time, but they do eventually fly out of your brooder.

If you’ve got a couple of chicks at once, you’ll find that within three weeks, they’ll have outgrown the coat of arms that you figured would last for at least a couple of months.

And they can’t get out easily until they’re at least eight weeks old. Depending on the breed and the circumstances, it can take 11 weeks to get closer. They need to be too big to attract birds of prey, big enough to survive the harassment of the rest of your flock.

Going outside during the summer months may be a matter of concern if there is excessive heat. Chicks have more trouble controlling their temperature than humans do.

Chicks, too, will quickly die from the cold. And if you don’t have a safe place to sleep, you ‘re going to have a problem with your feet.

Before then, where are you going to keep them? Will you have a spot outside where you can keep warm? So are you going to have to hide it in your house?

And believe me, as the chickens begin to grow, they smell. A lot of it, man. If the bathroom you thought would be a fun, safe place for your chick-babies is a place you don’t want to look at?

Planning for incubation or buying chicks, do you have time and money?

My next question is relevant before we even look at how to incubate or buy chickens. It’s: are you totally sure you have the time, courage, resources, and money for chickens? Not the tiny fluffies that will hatch your eggs, but the adults who will depend on you for their food, water, protection, and a healthy place to stay for a few years?

The issue of money is important since incubation can be expensive and eggs can be expensive. Leaving the eggs or the chicks aside for a bit, there’s all the stuff you’ve got to buy for a decent incubation, and for life after hatching, in the brooder.

If you are going to incubate, that’s the cost of incubators and candles. You’re going to need waterers, feeders, and chick feed for your chicks. They don’t forget to feed chickens because they’re adults. It’s a grit and an oyster shell. And they all want to treat their baby chickens.

Then there’s the embroiderer, the bedding, the heat lamp when the chicks are inside, not to mention the coop when they’re old enough. Add to the future veterinary expenses and you’ve got a drain on your income which you’d have a lot of eggs to make up for. So, a word of warning: if you’re dreaming about buying chickens for free food, think again.

Were you prepared to go wrong when you incubate your baby chicks? What about your relatives, your grandchildren, etc.?

The incubation and hatching of the chickens is the most beautiful sight. Hey, much of it. And it might have been catastrophic. Successful hatches don’t happen overnight, even if you’re doing the right thing. Eggs are also obviously not fertile. They are always fertile and start developing, but then they die very early, for reasons that are not always understandable.

Are you able to find a blood ring when you might light an incubated egg? When are you going to explain this to your children? Occasionally a chick hatches, but he has serious physical issues. And often, at the very point of birth, a chick dies, or shortly after. Hatting is a complex process, and a newly hatched chick is a delicate one. There are a lot of things that can go wrong, even if you’re experienced.

Chicken run and ways to manage one

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Chicken run and ways to manage one

So you’ve got your coop, and you’ve confirmed it’s got everything a chicken would need. But what’s about the chicken run?

What’s a chicken run and why do you need to have one?

Ideally, most of us would like to free our flock: that is, to allow them to move freely on our property. Yet our individual situations mean that this is not always possible.

We don’t all have the time to sit our chickens down and make sure they don’t get any harm because they’re safe. Predators, noise, neighbors who don’t want them in their gardens-and their potential to kill our own plants-may all mean that our chickens will somehow be enclosed.

Yet happy chickens want to be out there. Their normal activity is searching round between grass, or leaves for bugs, or lying with wings spread out to the light, or digging a dust bath under their favorite tree.

Which is where the chicken run is coming in. Chicken run is essentially an enclosed space where your flock can ride safely. And, of course, the more outdoor space you can offer them, the happier they will be.

Where big should a chicken run be?

You’ll see different statistics in different locations for this, but the right absolute minimum space for a chicken enclosed in a chicken run is one square meter per egg. You should allow a little less for small breeds like the Silkie; you can allow more for larger breeds.

That’s a bare minimum, though.  Chickens who don’t have enough space are likely to get bored and/or violent, so activity that you really don’t want, such as abuse, feather-picking and egg-eating, is much more likely.

Allowing birds to have enough space to engage in their instinctive behavior decreases the risk of the disease is a problem.

Can you use your garden as a chicken run?

It’s also possible to have chickens in your little garden or backyard. Only make sure you’re not overdoing the numbers. It’s always tempting to buy more hens, but keep your flock size suited for the room you’ve got.

Bear in mind, too, that hens are sociable animals. We don’t want to be on their own. The optimal number is three hens in a small garden. You have a business and, if one dies suddenly, you still have each other before you can add another to the flock.

So even though you have a little more space, keep your hens satisfied by keeping the number at three and giving them more space, rather than increasing the number.

A smart way to make use of space in a smaller location is to have an elevated coop like this one, which has a run location both below and to the side.

How safe does your chicken run have to be?

Foxes, coyotes, pigs, raccoons, mice, pine martens, or any other member of the Weasel family, birds of prey, all predators have various ways to get you on the run, and hence your coop. Because if this happens, your chickens become someone else’s dinner right away.

Here’s what chicken runs need to be as healthy as we can get it:

  • Fencing is at least 6 feet tall. Foxes are permitted to climb. Chickens are permitted to ride.
  • Fencing that’s buried at least 18 “deep. Animals like digging, rats like burrowing.
  • An ‘L’ shaped fencing skirt to avoid animals from coming anywhere near the bottom of the fence.
  • Strong, chain-link wrestling. Chicken wire isn’t solid enough.
  • A fence distance as low as possible. Rats and the Weasel family are able to squeeze into the smallest of gaps.
  • Cover the top of the run-make it hard for the birds of prey to swoop.
  • Padlocks on bars or frames. Raccoons have incredibly strong claws that can open latches in a moment.

Keeping the chicken run clean.

It would go without saying that chickens kept enclosed ought to keep their surroundings clean. Not doing so is going to attract vermin and disease. Bird flu is believed to have originated from a dirty climate.

In the case of large grassy areas or flocks using the tractor process, this is not so much a concern as drops never stack up. And sand on the ride is quickly kept clean by scooping drops out with something like a kitty litter scoop every day.

Other coverings in smaller runs need to be kept as clear of drops as possible. Pick up the worst every day, and clean up the cover every month. If the run has a rough foundation like asphalt, using a good washer and a strong disinfectant. Start using a chemical sanitizer for plants.

Managing chicken run during winter

Winter is seeing the rainy weather. Snow, rain, fog, a lot of it. You intend to run until you start building. If you’ve got a herd, trying to push the run-unless it’s a really small one-will be a lot more difficult.

  • If the area is especially vulnerable to water accumulation, position a run on a slope-or dig one out. If that is not feasible, install a simple drainage device to eliminate the water.
  • Using the paving slabs as a foundation, with one of the overlays on top. It has the advantage of stopping tunneling rodents. The slabs would need to be washed off on a regular basis, but are quickly sluiced off.
  • The best substance to put on top of a wet run is either sand or chopped grass. Each can absorb at least some of the water, but be careful with the straw to avoid anything that stays damp for more than a day.
  • When all else fails, build a walkway with some pallets. This provides a respite from the damp-the birds may hop off and have a forage and go back and dry.
  • Never leave your chickens with nothing but mud to stand within. This is asking for trouble.

Managing chicken run in the summer

It’s a lot easier for chickens to stay warm than to keep cool. Temperature exhaustion can be a killer. And there needs to be provided on your way to keep the flock cool during the summer months.

  • Placing a run under a big tree is a perfect solution if it is feasible. If it’s not a choice right now, plant some fruit trees that have the dual benefit of giving shade once they’ve grown, and providing the flock with its own fruit supply once they’re old enough.
  • Hanging a large tarpaulin across the corner of the coop offers some much-needed shade below.
  • Climbing plants on the fence will provide shade, but mine will never get far until the chickens eat them. Plant on the outside of the road, otherwise the roots would be dug before they have a chance to establish themselves.
  • Make sure you’ve got plenty of water, frozen snacks, and other ways to stay cool.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.

 

 

Lavender aromatherapy., learn about its effects on your chickens.

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Lavender aromatherapy, learn about its effects on your chickens.

If you want happy, safe hens, coop bug control, and a peaceful run, you can’t go wrong with lavender aromatherapy. Here’s the explanation. There is no real scientific evidence on the therapeutic effects of chicken lavender.

There’s a lot of anecdotal material on the internet that sings its praises. And it’s considered to be a gentle herb that won’t hurt your chickens, even if it’s eaten.

Herbs can be a perfect addition to holistic care for the wellbeing of your poultry. As long as you don’t assume that your chickens can be cured of practically any herbal disease on their own, you’re not going far wrong.

 lavender aromatherapy.is used as a source of relief to chickens

In humans, relatively comprehensive research has shown that the scent of lavender can lower the heart rate and lower blood pressure. Tests have also been performed on rats that show that exposure to oil for seven consecutive days significantly decreased anxiety. Similar work on mice and rabbits with both oil and dried flower buds has shown the same results.

No studies have been carried out on the effects of lavender on chickens, but considering its soothing effects over a wide variety of other animals, it is possibly fair to conclude that it can also help relax chickens.

Hens do not like noise and tend to be undisturbed and comfortable as they sleep, so they can enjoy the occasional touch of lavender in their nest boxes.

Lavender aromatherapy is used for soothing chickens

Work on lavender with mice has shown that it is capable of calming down aggression. It goes hand-in-hand with its consequences of calming down the central nervous system: a less heightened, more relaxed state of consciousness is expected to follow.

Is it going to calm down an angry rooster?

Evidence suggests that the benefits of aromatherapy are not especially long-lasting. So, while the violent rooster may become nicer when he’s in the immediate vicinity of the lavender, it’s doubtful that he’d stay that way out of the coop.

It’s worth a try, but don’t expect it to deter the rooster from assaulting you if that’s what his instincts are telling him to do. If you would like to try the soothing effects of lavender in the main roost, sprinkle some dried buds with whatever sort of bedding you use.

Also, be careful with the use of fresh herbs in bedding-it will rot unless you change it very often. Instead, hang a few bunches of new lavender around your coop. That’s exactly what I do, and if nothing else, it makes the room smell good!

Lavender aromatherapy can also be used for wound healing.

Medical research has shown the antibacterial role of essential oils, the tea tree being the most active and lavender, together with peppermint and thyme, coming near to the second. Tea tree oil, in addition, has been found to be effective in the fight against bacteria. It follows, therefore, that the use of a mixture of tea tree and lavender oil for any kind of chicken wound will help.

Lavender aromatherapy is used as a repellent for insects.

Chicken coops are known to attract flies, particularly in hot summer months. Aside from the obvious means of keeping flies in the bay-keeping bedding clean and dry, scooping poops every day, removing wet or unused food-lavender will help.

Of course, whether you believe in using natural remedies for your flock is entirely up to you. Scientific proof exists for the importance of lavender, as can be seen here. But it’s not the solution to anything, and as always, you have to make your own decision on what’s best for your flock.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.

Heat Lamp; why you need to provide them for your chick

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Heat Lamp; why you need to provide them for your chick

Do you have fresh chicks in the brooder? Then, you need to keep them warm because they’re going to get cold fast. Getting a reliable heat lamp to maintain the correct temperature in the coop is one of the most important issues for keeping your new chicks safe.  This is because, without it, they will get cold really easily and die.

Also, the fuzzy chick hatches can’t protect them from the cold, and it is only when they are feathered, around eleven weeks later, that they will be able to regulate their own temperature.

Until then, you’re going to have to play the part of the mother hen and keep their temperature at the right point.

What’s the perfect temperature of a heat lamp for your chicks?

You’ll need to keep a close eye on the temperature of the brooder because hatchlings move into it after the might have spent at least a few hours drying out in a good, hot incubator at 99oF/37.5oC. Clear specifications for heat levels that will start at week 1 are therefore usually accepted. It is important that the temperature should be about 95oF/35oC at that point.

Keep in mind, however, that the heat of the brooder would also be influenced by the temperature of the room in which it is housed and the number of hatchlings in it too. The more chicks, the more they huddle together to keep each other warm.

So if you’re brooding in the middle of a hot summer, for example, you might not need a heat lamp in your brooder at all. You do need to be mindful that they have to be kept clear of draughts.

How to make sure the temperature is the right one?

One way to do this is to use a wireless thermometer such as those used in the terrarium. They’re cheap and can be life-saving, particularly if you don’t have a radiant heat lamp. Remember that your chicks are a heat lamp specialist. Therefore, thermometers and temperature grids are fine, but your hatchlings themselves are the best indicators of whether they’re warm enough.

How is that? Just watch their conduct, listen to the noises they make. When they are dispersed across the walls of your brooder, keeping it far away from the heat lamp, is there any sign of panting?

They’re probably going to be too dry. Chicks who are too hot will develop problems, including dehydration and a pasty behind. Reduce the temperature by increasing the temperature of the heat lamp if you have one or lowering the temperature in the room.

Are they huddled together close to the source of heat and peeping loudly? They’re probably going to be too cold. Chicks will relax easily and die quickly. Increase the heat in your brooder until it is more comfortable.

Chicks who are comfortably warm without being either hot or cold will go about their business eating, drinking, and playing, scattered around the brooder, peeling cheerfully but not in distress.

What kind of heat lamp is right for you?

The heat lamp suspended over the embroiderer is used by many men. It’s inexpensive and it works to a certain degree. The infrared lamp is more effective than the white lamp, as it doesn’t stop the chicks from sleeping, as white light does, which can help avoid pecking. Instead, a lamp like this doesn’t give off any light at all. But it’s getting incredibly hot to the touch, so be careful.

Overall benefits of a radiant heat lamp.

A radiant heat lamp offers both comfort and warmth. The sun warms the bodies of the chicks when they enter it, and they have a comfortable place to shelter and sleep when life is too hard for them.

There is no need to worry about the temperature because it’s regulated for you. The chicks are warmed to exactly the right degree; all you need to remember is to increase the height as they grow.

How long do the chicks need the heat from the heat lamp?

It depends on a few things:

Where you stay and the time of year you’re brooding, which determines how hot or cold the weather is.

Chicken breed: certain heavy breeds do not need heat for as long as smaller breeds. At what point your chicks have grown enough feathers as opposed to the down with which they are born. And this is a matter for your decision. Also, watch your chicks: as a rule of thumb, if they spend much of their time away from their heat lamp, they’re able to turn it off.

When to calculate the temperature of the brooder

It is necessary to note that the temperature must be continuously warm in the embroiderer. Using Brinsea EcoGlow gas, the temperature of the room itself must be at least 50oF (10oC). This is not efficient enough to maintain the correct temperature if the ambient temperature is lower.

If you’re concerned about whether your embroiderer is warm enough, buy a few cheap thermometers and hold them in the jar at different stages. Then you’ll know for sure whether you need to lift or lower the temperature.

Terrarium thermometers like this one are ideal; the probe stays inside the jar while the thermometer itself stays outside, making it difficult for chicks to peck-and much easier to read.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.

 

Why you should have a rooster among your flock

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Why you should have a rooster in your flock

If you’re thinking about introducing a rooster to your backyard flock, you’re going to find a lot of people telling you not to. There might be a good reason for you not to do that. This can, for example, be against the law.

A Rooster has Beautiful colors

Okay, so maybe that’s not the right excuse, but let’s be honest-the roosters can look absolutely beautiful.

Once the sun gets its colors, it will make them look iridescent. They’re bringing too much vibrancy to the chicken race.

Rooster + hens = chicks!

A hen with no rooster will always lay eggs. But an egg without a rooster is never going to be a bird. Much as in the human world, it takes a male and a female to produce a fertilized egg that will, under the right circumstances, transform into a chick.

Roosters hold the balance in the flock.

You’re going to have learned about the pecking order. It’s what’s going to happen between chickens in the same flock. There is a hierarchy of supremacy, and those hens that are at the top of the pecking order can be very aggressive with the ones below. You wouldn’t think of the hens-the the sweet, quiet creatures they are. But it doesn’t always work like that. Having a male in a flock will help to maintain the pecking order because, in the male-dominated world of nature, roosters are often at the top.

Roosters are going to protect their flock from all predators

That’s what their aggression is all about. It’s their responsibility to protect their flock, and instinctively they’re going to do it even against the most terrifying predator. Roosters have been known to shield their hens from birds of prey and even coyotes. A strong rooster is always going to be in the front line first.

So, if you want your hens to be safe from predators at all times-and note, you can’t be with them 24/7-you need a male in your flock.

The Rooster Crows

A lot of people will see this as a problem, and most people love it. Have you ever found that the roosters are going to crow at more or less everything? Morning, at night, when it’s sunny, when it’s raining. So more or less of a stimulus? For example, the sound of a car engine?

It’s not just a random thing. They’re crowing for reasons. Some of the time, it’s to make sure other roosters know it’s their turf. It’s one of the ways they’re shielding their hens. Likewise, with car engines-they think it’s the sound of either a competitor or a predator. It’s time to crow, either way.

And next time you hear an ear-splitting crow, remember: he lets you know that this is his territory. So far as he is concerned, no-one else is allowed to enter-and that could include you. This could be loud. This could be a tone that the elected authorities don’t want to hear. This may be a tone that the neighbors object to.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.

Red fox, how to protect your chicken from this predator

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Red fox, how to protect your chicken from this predator

The red fox is stunning in its prime, and it’s easily identified by its orange-red coat and bushy tail, it is widely found in the northern, and southern hemispheres. Unfortunately, for backyard chicken keepers, it’s also one of the biggest chicken super-predators.

Where does the red fox live?

It’s important to be able to spot the habitat of a red fox so you know if you have it in your town. They are one of the most resourceful animals, unfairly sly or cunning, and have learned to adapt to a variety of very different habitats.

And you’re going to find them in the forest and urban areas, where they’re best known.

Their habitat is a series of burrows, most commonly found in tree trunks. For urban areas, you will often find them under the sheds. You will know the entrance as a fairly large one. They appear to spray their scent on the entrance so that they can easily find it again. If you have a puppy, it’s easy to recognize the smell.

It’s important to note that the foxes are very good burrowers, and they’re professionals, it’s how they make their home. So burrowing under your chicken run is no problem for them, unless you take steps to prevent it from happening.

How to detect the presence of a red fox

Foxes use their poo-called scat-to mark their ground, so it’s easy to see. Take a lookout over the lawn, along the edge of your chicken park, along the roadsides.

You can even find it in urban settings on patios, porches, and garden furniture. It’s very easy to tell fox scat from dog drops. It is generally almost black in color in rural areas. If foxes live close to humans, it will be easier to eat household waste. It’s about three to five inches long and pointed to the top. You’ll see that it includes tiny undigested pieces of something they eat, berries or bones, fur, or feathers. And the scent of the fox is very strong and unmistakable.

What does the red fox eat?

It depends entirely on where they live. Some people think of foxes as meat-eaters, but in truth they’re omnivores, and they’re going to eat whatever they can.

They will survive on berries and fruit if they have to, but they are also ace hunters of small mammals, including rabbits, hares, squirrels, frogs, rodents, and snakes. They’ll enjoy your chickens, of course, if they can.

In urban environments, they have learned to store dustbins or recycle bins for discarded food. We also discovered that some householders would feed them, and that they would appear at the same time every day for their milk.

And, wherever you stay, don’t make a mistake, your chickens will be on the red fox menu.

How do you know if it was a fox that took your chickens? You’re going to find a bunch of feathers, but nobody. The fox is always going to take their prey back to their den.

How the red fox finds chickens to eat?

It’s the red fox and its senses.

Fox hunts primarily by a combination of hearing, which is its most acute sense, and, to a lesser degree, vision.

Their ears are able to travel independently, so that they are able to locate the origin of the sounds almost exactly. They are especially able to pick up low-frequency noises like rusting, so chickens rooted in straw or leaves will be picked up instantly.

Surprisingly, Smell is not as well-known as some other mammals, although still thought to be relatively sensitive, used to detect both their own and other fox lands.

The sight of the red fox is the least important of these three senses. Studies have shown that they are generally very short-sighted.

Don’t make a mistake, red foxes are good climbers!

They are usually nocturnal animals, and their sight evolved in order to be able to see at night more clearly. The fact that they are now still hunting by day means that they rely on being able to see movement, rather than specific shapes, until they are very close to their prey.

The red fox can run fact too.

Young foxes are able to move at speeds of up to 48 kilometers per hour (about 30 mph). The pace at which they leap on their prey is a lot faster than your chickens can ever hope to move.

Foxes are good at climbing.

While foxes tend to live underground, they will live above, if appropriate. Like other members of the dog family, they evolved to become successful climbers, using their hooked claws to scale fences and trees.

Together with the ability to jump over a meter (more than three feet) in height, this ensures that red foxes can climb fences of six feet or more using their paws. And as well as being able to catch chickens by burrowing, they will strike from above by climbing.

How to protect your chickens from red foxes.

With all this information about foxes, it’s not hard to come to a conclusion about how best our chickens can be safe from them. The fox is a resourceful animal that just needs to put a square meal on the table. But there are ways to prevent our chickens from being our food.

  • Keep an eye out for the tell-tale signs and sounds of foxes in the area. This way, you will always be alert to the potential danger.
  • Be especially alert from early April to mid-May when fox cubs need to be fed.
  • The free range understands the potential danger. Foxes can hear free range chickens a mile or more away. Just free range if you can understand that your chickens would not be able to run fast enough to survive a fox attack.
  • Make sure your fence is at least two meters (six feet) tall-preferably higher. If possible, install an electrical fencing attached to the overhanging posts that stretches outwards from the top of the fence by approximately 50 cm (18).
  • When you’re in an urban area and you have friends who want to treat foxes as pets, don’t question them. Or, at the very least, ask them to feed the fox in the night after your flock has roosted.
  • Accept that we may lose chickens from time to time, as best we try. Foxes are very adaptable and enterprising. If they can find a way around a problem, they’ll do it.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.

What is Fermentation and why it’s good for your chickens?

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What is Fermentation and why it's good for your chickens?

You may have heard of fermented food, but do you know if it’s healthy for your flock? There are some mixed opinions on the Internet as to whether or not fermentation or fermenting food for poultry is safe for them.

How is fermentation, exactly?

If you’ve ever eaten yogurt or cheese, you’ve eaten a food that has gone through a fermentation process. Fermentation is simply a system of steeping solids in a liquid that releases naturally occurring bacteria that are good for the health of the intestine. You undoubtedly heard of the probiotics, that’s just what fermentation creates.

As well as making it impossible for “poor” bacteria to live in the intestine, they make food more digestible and increase the availability of protein. Around the same time, the cycle raises the sum of vitamins K, C, and B.

Is fermented food healthy for chickens?

As you might guess the answer to that is a Yes for chickens. Bacteria are a vital part of our ability to digest and use food. These days, medications such as antibiotics and the abundance of fast food will deplete the amount of “healthy” bacteria that our intestines contain naturally.

This means that food is not processed as well as it should be, and our body is lacking the nutrients it requires to function in a healthy way. The net result is that we are becoming more prone to infection and disease. Fermentation raises the number of bacteria so that our intestines are practically teeming with them. Although this might not sound very friendly, the truth is, it’s just what we need.

What are the special advantages of fermentation for chickens?

Here are the findings of the research on the effects of the fermentation process especially for chickens:

  • Increases healthy bacteria in the intestine
  • Lactic acid content produces an atmosphere in which dangerous bacteria cannot thrive.
  • Forms a natural defense against the Salmonella virus
  • Increased resistance to infection
  • Food is used more effectively, leading to improved absorption of vitamins and minerals.
  • Boost the power of eggshells
  • Boost the weight of eggs
  • High protein content makes it especially good for chickens in winter and for molten/unwell birds.
  • Great for new chicks-keep them hydrated and encourage protein development
  • Less food wastage-the the chickens don’t kick it all out of their way!
  • The chickens love it until they get used to it!

The most important benefit of information is

Probably the most important advantage of fermentation is the resistance of fermented food to infection. In fact, they are so effective in preventing infection that in commercial livestock farming where antibiotics are not required or not desired, fermented foods are used as a matter, of course, to keep animals safe.

Are there any drawbacks here?

The fermentation method can have different outcomes. For the best results, a consistent temperature is required. Chickens will take some time to get used to their taste. It’s best to add fermented food when they’re young chicks.

It can be a good advantage for chickens that have been sick, for example, or support through the mold, but it can also contribute to health issues. Fat chickens are not safe at all! There was evidence in one trial that the feed itself was infected, but it was found to be an issue with the consistency of the feed and the process, not the fermentation itself.

One study found that fermented foods often cause botulism due to toxic bacteria.

However, it has also been made clear that the fermenting food has been kept in airtight, plastic containers for too long. So long as you use a high-quality feed, keep the fermenting food in a high jar, obey the directions and give your chickens time to get used to it, there really shouldn’t be any problems.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.

When should baby chicks go outside?

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When should baby chicks go outside?

When should baby chicks go outside?

So your sweet, fluffy little chicks are growing up and getting bored. It’s time for the nest to float. Yet are they still too young to get outside? Where is it warm enough? How are you going to keep them safe? And how are they going to be introduced? It’s going to happen to us all. Those small, fluffy babies are starting to develop. They’re outgrowing their first embroiderer, so you’re going to buy them a bigger one.

They’re trying their wings, so you’re putting some mesh over the top of the big embroiderer. They continue to smell, so you can move them from the house to the basement or garage. Yet sooner or later, they need to get out of here-for everyone’s sake.

Before you can start talking about integrating the chicks with the flock, it’s a good idea to get your chicks used to being outside. It’s a huge, frightening world for a chick, after all, after the safety of the broader.

Read also: why you should have chain feeder in your chicken coop

First off, that’s what we’re looking for: some of my baby chicks enjoying time outside in the heat. At what point is it appropriate for baby chicks to go outside?

Baby chicks are down and rapidly grow wing feathers. Yet you’ve got to make sure it’s warm when they go outside. A bird, 4 weeks old. Wing feathers have been grown, but her body is still covered in the down. It’s going to rely on the time of year you’re hatching and what the weather is like in your city.

If babies are born by a mother hen, of course, they’re out of day 1-but they still have their mother to run back to instant warmth if things get a little cold.

Read also: what should baby chicks drink?

When you’ve laid eggs in an incubator, you’ll need to take some care to make sure young people don’t get frozen. So the first piece of advice I have is: wait until they are at least four weeks old before you expose them to the outside world and only then if the weather where you are is dry.  Don’t do it if there’s snow on the ground.

By that point, they’ll have some feathers that are their main means of staying warm, but wing feathers grow first, and the rest of the body is likely to be mostly covered in the down. So it doesn’t hold the sundown. This means that they’re not going to be able to sustain heat for a very long time at this point. Normally, they’re going to be completely feathered for around week 11-12.

Plan before you take the chicks outside

You can’t just take the babies outside and leave them to fend for themselves. They’re extremely vulnerable. And talk of your own case. Will you have a place for them to go? Grass is the strongest one, but it needs to be cut short.

Read also: all you need to know about molting

Long pieces of grass can cause crops to be damaged, even in adult chickens. Were there predators around here? If so, how do you protect your baby? Should you just sit outside with them?

When are you going to handle it? And very tiny chicks are going to wander. They need to be able to explore, but at the same time, they need to be protected.

Would you have a way for them to get water when they’re outside? Do you have a spot where they can escape if they feel scared? Chicks who are not used to outside sounds will be frightened very easily. Its love to provide them with a safe spot.

How long are the chicks expected to be outside?

Once my babies first step out, I normally leave them out for no longer than a few hours. That’s enough time for them to learn, to begin to get used to odd sounds, and not to get chilled. Yet, as always, use the common sense and experience of your own flock.

Will they look like they’re puffing up their feathers? They could be getting cold. Are they peeping in the scared way you’ve heard before? If so, what is it that scares them? Can you help, or do they just need to get inside?

Most significantly, don’t abandon them on their own. You’ve got to watch them.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.

How to eliminate rats in the chicken coop

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How to eliminate rats in the chicken coop

Having rats in the chicken house is something nobody wants to see. And it’s not always easy to tell the difference between rats and mice. It’s tempting to see facts, and to say, “It’s just a little field mouse, what harm can he do?” Don’t leave it.

Read also: How much garlic should you feed your chickens

Use poison to eliminate rats.

An efficient means of elimination, but not a long-lasting solution. I had to use rat poison because the rodent infestation had become too big by the time I realized that any other, longer-term approach would potentially put my chickens at risk of disease. Rats are multiplying very rapidly. But poison really ought to be the last resort. It’s an awful death for rodents, potentially dangerous to pets, livestock and humans, and not a matter to be taken lightly.

READ ALSO: Wry neck in chickens, how to prevent it

Use the electrical traps to get rid of rats.

Such traps are battery operated. The rodent, drawn by a yummy treat to the cage, steps on a metal plate. This triggers an electrical shock that kills immediately. The biggest benefit is that it is fairly fast and the rat is killed without blood being shed, which makes it easier to clean up. It’s also difficult for dogs or poultry to fit inside, so it’s safe for other species. So they’re not hurting the climate.

The old favorite-snap frames.

Fast and effective, but messy. When to use it. Placed in areas where you know the rodents are going, usually along the edge of a chicken run or a detached house.

Place them out of the reach of your babies, chickens, or other animals. Keep them there for a few days without baiting before the rodents get used to them. Rats are patient animals, so they’re not going to get close to something new and unknown.

Cheese is the accepted bait, but try to bait it with peanut butter, really! The rats are really drawn to the smell, so you’re just going to need a tiny dandruff.

Read also: How to take care of your chicken while on vacation

The human traps for rats.

The strongest human traps are made of metal. You’ll find details about making plastic bottles on the internet, but even the mice can gnaw through a bottle in a matter of minutes. Rats are going to take seconds.

Is the removal of rats a priority? Have a cat around

Not a choice for everyone and you need a cat of the right sort! This is third on my list because it’s another option I’ve found that is very successful, particularly when combined with a battery-operated trap. If you’re thinking about getting a cat to keep control of the mouse or rat population, it really needs to be a big feral or barn-like animal that’s used to living outside and taught its mother how to deal with the problem. The smaller, domesticated cats are unlikely to have the strength to take on a full-grown rodent.

Read also: How coconut water can be useful to your birds

Be alert, however, on how any cat interacts with chickens. It’s very normal for cats to kill baby chicks-after all, they look like birds to a cat-and some may even take full-grown hens.

Use glue to get rid of rats

Used mainly by commercial companies because they are cheap and very effective. They’re basically glued pads set in rat-run locations. If the rodents-or something else-move to them, they find themselves trapped. The animal either dies of starvation trying to flee, starves to death. We catch everything that passes past them, including insects and birds.  If the animal doesn’t suffer from fatigue or physically break itself apart trying to flee, you’re going to have to kill it.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.

Chicken mites: how to eliminate them in the coop

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Chicken mites: how to eliminate them in the coop

Chicken mites: how to eliminate them in the coop

Perhaps your chickens were concerned about mites? We need support, and so do you. Once the weather is warmer, a bird’s mite can become a real problem for your flock.

What are chicken mites, what do they look like?

Their scientific name is ‘Dermanyssus Gallinae,’ but more generally known as ‘Red Chicken Mites’ or ‘Red Poultry Mite.’ It’s a parasite that lives on the outside of the chicken and feeds its food. Really, they’re a light gray in color before they eat. When daylight arrives, they abandon the “host” and hide in cracks and crevices, only to come out to eat again when darkness falls.

Although they feed on chickens’ blood, they can live for as long as 34 weeks without it-which is why it’s important, if you have them, to make sure that all the bedding is burned, not reused. Myths are small.

How would you detect that you have mites in your coop?

The most obvious way is to test for signs in your chickens. These may include any or more of the following:

  • Loss of the feather
  • Scabs on hands and neck
  • Pale pegs and wattles
  • Falling out of egg development
  • Reluctance to go to the coop at night
  • Blood breaking on eggs

If you inspect your flock individually, you will see clumps of mites, particularly around the base of the feathers and the vent. To make sure they’re really what you’re dealing with, go to your coop at night with a torch and a sheet of white paper. Check it out around the perches. If you have a large number of people, you might be able to see them.

Rub the paper around the bottom of the ends. Does it have red dandruff? If it does, it’s confirmed-you’ve got a red chicken mite to deal with.

Would the mites all go away on their own?

No! No! If not treated, a few mites that turn into an infestation. And that could lead to death, because the chickens become so anaemic that they become prone to infection. Even if you catch them before they have a chance to reproduce a lot, they ‘re going to hurt your chickens. Imagine being stuck in a small room with mosquitoes biting you, and not being able to do anything to escape.

And if you have any intuition that you have a red mite, make sure you don’t neglect it. It’s not fun to have to deal with it, but it’s better than to make your chickens feel pain and probably die.

How to get rid of the mites: chemical therapy.

I like to try natural pest control methods wherever possible-whether it’s with a rat infestation or these annoying insects. Yet because they’re so good at survival, mites are especially hard to get rid of. Often, therefore, chemicals are the only solution.

When the infestation is very bad, you can have no choice but to use a chemical solution to contain the insects. You would then be able to follow up with the gentler, more natural preventive approaches mentioned above.

  • Don’t make a mistake-these chemicals are poisons. Also, take the following precautions:
  • Using your protective gloves and a decent mask. Breathe in the dust on no account.
  • Keep away from your children and pets.
  • Don’t use it outside on a windy day! Keep as much influence as possible of the distribution of these powders.
  • Use away from places where “healthy” garden insects, such as bees, migrate. Most are lethal to bees-this is one of the reasons why the population of bees is declining.
  • Take notice of the warnings for each drug. Some of them are toxic to birds, others to waterfowl.
  • To apply, keep the wings of the chicken away from its body and sprinkle thoroughly under the wings and in the vent area, whatever dust you use.
  • Do not rub over the chicken liberally. In particular, avoid the region of the eyes.
  • And if only one chicken appears to have mites, you ‘re going to have to handle the entire flock. The others are likely to have latent eggs, which will hatch in a few days unless they are handled.
  • Treatment will be done three times, with one week between treatments. This is to make sure that all the larvae and active mites are destroyed.

Where to buy Chickens in Akwa Ibom State

Since chicken is the only meat that has no negative health conditions, you can always use it to prepare any local and continental dishes of your choice. In Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria, you can buy chickens from sofreshchikens.com at the following locations;

  • Uyo, The Akwa Ibom State capital:

    Number 215 Udo Umana Street opposite Akpan Andem Market, Uyo

  • Oron, Akwa Ibom State:

    Number 27 Market Square by Aba Street, Oron, Akwa Ibom State

  • Eket, Akwa Ibom State:

3 park road, opposite Chinese market, Eket.